1. Can’t read this book but it’s so pretty I want to take it home. THIS IS THE PROBLEM WITH RETURNING TO WORK.

  2. I am putting aside all the pockets to shelve on their own. Here is a random stack of them. I had forgotten I owned some of these titles.

    I am putting aside all the pockets to shelve on their own. Here is a random stack of them. I had forgotten I owned some of these titles.

  3. Laser Books catalogue, part of some promo materials that came into my store some time ago with a collection of most of these books. I love the lurid covers of these books. Found this as I was beginning a great purge of my library today.

    Laser Books catalogue, part of some promo materials that came into my store some time ago with a collection of most of these books. I love the lurid covers of these books. Found this as I was beginning a great purge of my library today.

  4. Info cards for Connie Willis manuscript I own. I got it at a Boskone benefit auction in the ’80s. I thought the cards had disappeared (the manuscript is still in the manila folder in which it was donated). Deciding if I should contact UNC to add it to her papers.

    Info cards for Connie Willis manuscript I own. I got it at a Boskone benefit auction in the ’80s. I thought the cards had disappeared (the manuscript is still in the manila folder in which it was donated). Deciding if I should contact UNC to add it to her papers.

  5. It’s a lie that poetry is only read by or “speaks to” people in the universities or elite intellectual circles; in many such places, poetry barely speaks at all.

    Poems are written and absorbed, silently and aloud, in prisons, in prairie kitchens, urban basement workshops, branch libraries, battered women’s shelters, homeless shelters, offices, a public hospital for disabled people, an HIV support group. A poet can be born in a house with empty bookshelves. Sooner or later, s/he will need books.

    — 

    Adrienne Rich, What Is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics, 1994. (via insufficientmind)

    My 5-year-old daughter read an entire book of poetry with me yesterday and loved it, so this quotation resonates with me (the book in question is Here’s a Little Poem: A First Book of Poetry).

  6. A book received, soon to be read.

    A book received, soon to be read.

  7. juddgeeksout:


Read a Book Day!

I’m a professional. Try this at home.

Heh. Follow the old ways!

    juddgeeksout:

    Read a Book Day!

    I’m a professional. Try this at home.

    Heh. Follow the old ways!

    (Source: amandaonwriting)

  8. juddgeeksout:


Read a Book Day!

I’m a professional. Try this at home.

    juddgeeksout:

    Read a Book Day!

    I’m a professional. Try this at home.

    (Source: amandaonwriting)

  9. Take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.

    —  Elie Wiesel (via dangerouswitnesses)

    (Source: officialteamgreen)

  10. 1690s book with filigree silver binding - National Library of Sweden

    This binding is an exquisite example of Danish filigree technique
    from the 1690s.It belongs to the National Library’s Huseby
    Collection and was once owned by Karren Mogensdotter Skoug.
    Her name and the year 1692 are engraved on the inside of the clasps. -(x)

    (Source: tirairgid)